An independent professional's take on the latest news and trends in global financial markets

Economists and banks

Some observations on economists from veteran US investor Laslzo Birinyi, writing in the Financial Times.

In my experience, economists are not equipped by training or discipline to provide insight and guidance on stocks. As manifest by an number of cliches, the bond market is about here and now, while stocks are always looking ahead. Hence economists, almost by definition, “lead from the rear”.

Their recent concern regarding the banks and the implication for the financial system may indeed be correct, but I would note that the recent weakness of the traditional banks is actually the norm. In the nine bull markets back to 1962, 48 per cent of banks’s ultimate gains was made in the first two months of the rally. In the last two bull markets, after the first two months, banks not only underperformed, they were actually down the rest of the rally.

US bank shares certainly have been going nowhere for some time.

Meanwhile, as the market has been indicating since the weekend, the narrow Greek vote in favour of the austerity programme – although it does nothing but defer the country’s inevitable sovereign debt default  - looks likely to be the trigger for a reversal of the straight line fall in equities and bond yields which has been such a striking feature of the last two months in the markets.

Written by Jonathan Davis

June 30, 2011 at 6:41 AM