An independent professional's take on the latest news and trends in global financial markets

Archive for the ‘Deutsche Bank’ Category

Mixed messages from the markets

Two contrasting views today that neatly sum up the current rather feverish market dynamics. This link summarises Deutsche Bank’s view that the worst case outcome the Eurozone crisis could be a 35% fall in global stock markets. And here, on the other hand, is the latest weekly view from fund managers Artemis, citing six reasons to be cheerful.

Of course the whole world could still go to blazes in debt’s handcart. It might well. But on balance, we prefer to remember that the FTSE 100 is (just) above its level as 2011 began. And that’s despite, it’s worth remembering, Japan’s tsunami, war in Libya, Arabian unrest, nemesis in Greece and the end of American QE.

Corporate health. Sure, there’s more bad news to come, we reckon, for most UK retailers. But there’s still much less credit risk in most companies than there is in governments. Take a stock like Hunting (oilfield services). It has cash of £300 million, a third of its market cap. Or publisher Reed. It’s priced at 11.5x, has a 4% yield, diversified earnings and improving margins. Japan’s NTT Docomo (mobile telecoms, 3.8% yield) has more cash than it knows what to do with.

M&A. Weaker sterling makes UK assets even more attractive to foreign (war) chests. Negative real interest rates in the west. These force investors, reluctantly or otherwise, into (high yielding) equities. Pessimism. It’s pronounced. If history has any predictive power, the gloom suggests this is a ‘buying signal’. Emerging markets. China seems to be Goldilockian. The prospects are patent, and the growth is good. The best western companies will continue to make their money there, not here. QE2. Its positive effects will take time, but will benefit the US economy.

What all this confirms to me is that the market, as always, has great difficulty in finding a level when there is a wide range of potential outcomes, some of them extreme. The Eurozone crisis is a good case in point.  The way the crisis has evolved is as much an indictment of the inadequate way that Europe’s political class have responded to the new threat of sovereign debt default as it is about the underlying gravity of the potential problem.

Meanwhile, the interesting part about Mr Bernanke’s recent testimony, to my mind, is the reaffirmation that his whole approach to running the Federal Reserve is rooted in his paramount desire to avoid deflation at any cost.  if he does restart a further round of printing money (quantitative easing), it will be because the Fed sees a real risk of deflation once more.

The odds are still against a worst case outcome at this point, but there is no denying that it is a possibility, and that is what sends risk-averse investors scuttling for protection. In these circumstances remember all those stories about a big turn in sentiment towards gold and other commodities in the early part of the year? Gold’s continued ascent to new highs tells a different story.

Written by Jonathan Davis

July 15, 2011 at 2:00 PM