An independent professional's take on the latest news and trends in global financial markets

Archive for the ‘Future Investment Returns’ Category

Stock market bubbles under the microscope

My thanks to Tim du Toit, founder of EuroshareLab, an excellent Europe-wide stock screening service, for alerting me to this interesting and sensible academic perspective on stock market bubbles – how to measure them, what to think about them, how to react to them.  The author is Aswath Damodoran, a professor at the Stern School of Business at New York University.  His article includes a number of spreadsheets which readers can usefully adapt to make their own calculations of PE ratios and future returns.

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Interview with Terry Smith

Terry SmithTerry Smith, the CEO of Tullett Prebon and founder of Fundsmith, was in top form when I interviewed him last week. An edited version of our conversation, which covers a range of topics, including the global economy, the impact of QE, current market valuations and stocks in the Fundsmith portfolio, appears in today’s issue of Money Week. If you are interested in reading the full length version, you can find it on the Independent Investor website. Simply follow the link to Money Week articles on the right hand side. Sample quote: “I’m not convinced there is a recovery – certainly, not of anything like the magnitude that people say there is”.

Written by Jonathan Davis

November 1, 2013 at 12:14 PM

Two events in October

Two events in my diary which you may be interested in. (1) Face to Face with John Kay: Martin Vander Weyer, Business Editor of The Spectator, and I are hosting an hour-long session of Q and A /debate with the prominent economist, author and FT columnist John Kay in London on October 22nd, starting at 8.45 am. Topics to be covered include banking reform, monetary policy/QE, the future of the Eurozone and investment strategy in an uncertain environment. More details here and ticket information from the Capital Briefings website. (2) The Ten Commandments of Investment Success: I am teaching a two hour seminar on the principles of successful investment on October 24th at 9am, also in central London, organised by the How To Academy. You can find out more by clicking on this link from the Academy website. This is something that I have been working on for a little while and hope to repeat at other venues in future.

Hold on to your hats in Japan

The dramatic upwards move in the Japanese equity market since the autumn has plenty further to go, according to Jonathan Ruffer, the founder of the private client fund management group Ruffer LLP, one of the professionals whose latest thinking I (and many others) like to follow closely.  Ruffer as a firm has held an overweight position in Japan for quite a long time, and now stands ready to be vindicated if Japan’s new reflation policy takes hold, as the markets now seem to be assuming. Writing in his latest quarterly review, he comments as follows:

We hold roughly half of portfolios in equities, in the UK, Europe, US and Asia, but the largest geographic position is in Japan. This market was broadly flat when we last wrote to you, although we had made good money in financial and property stocks. In the last quarter these and other holdings surged further, providing a strong finish to a dull year. The rationale in Japan remains intact; it is the warrant on world economic growth, and so more of the same in terms of monetary stimulus should favour Japan without the rest of the world’s downside. The stability of Japan, its lack of overcapacity, and the absence of financial or labour fragilities, give some protection, and afford it the ability to generate a self-sustaining economic recovery. The low expectations built into the possibility of a Japanese economic recovery provide the opportunity for further sharp market rises. The major obstacle to a more bullish backcloth has disappeared with the appointment of Abe as Prime Minister, and the forthcoming retirement of Shirikawa as Governor of the Bank of Japan. In this new world, the investment danger for foreigners is a weak yen (we have been fully hedged), but this is a benefit to the equity market. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Jonathan Davis

January 21, 2013 at 3:33 PM

The risk of a short circuit in markets

Richard Burns, until recently the senior partner at Baillie Gifford, is now chairman of a range of the firm’s investment trusts, including Mid Wynd International, a special situations fund that holds positions in interesting companies that are too small to make a difference to its flagship funds. This is his most recent take on the investment environment, taken from the trust’s annual report. With the Eurozone crisis continuing to cast a shadow over events, and equity markets not obviously cheap, cautious and pragmatic investors (a type much in evidence in Edinburgh) are mostly marking time for now.

Repeated central bank stimuli have managed to contain, for now, what would otherwise have been a combination of Western debt deflation and deep recession. These interventions buy time, but not an indefinite amount. Policy making in the afflicted parts of the Western world appears to be running up against the laws of diminishing returns. Underlying sovereign balance sheets are deteriorating further meantime. What has happened is akin to stripping insulation from the bare economic wire – governments and central banks are that insulation. As time goes on, and in the absence of a more potent recovery, the risk of short-circuit increases.

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Written by Jonathan Davis

August 30, 2012 at 9:04 AM

Why quality stocks pay off

It is no accident that some of the best performing fund managers of the last few years have been those who have stuck to investing in powerful global equities with a consistent history of profitability and sustainable earnings and dividends. In the UK those who fall into this camp include Neil Woodford at Invesco Pereptual, Nick Train of Lindsell Train, Sebastian Lyon at Troy Asset Management (mentioned in my last post) and Terry Smith, whose equity funds solely buy and hold this kind of high return on equity stock. It is also of course at the root of Warren Buffett’s long success as an equity investor.

But why do so-called quality equities (defined as stocks which have low leverage, high returns on equity and consistent earnings) perform so well, yet are so regularly overlooked by the majority of investors in favour of more speculative growth stories? A recent research note from Jeremy Grantham’s team at GMO uses long run US data to highlight the persistently superior performance of quality stocks and their particular attractions in today’s binary (“risk on, risk off”) market conditions. The primary driver behind this superior performance is the ability of these companies to preserve and grow capital, not to lose or squander it as many do, either through incompetence or normal competitive pressures.

Here are a couple of short extracts from the GMO research paper:

True competitive equilibrium is a rarity in the global economy. Instead, we find persistent winners and persistent losers. The competitive paradigm says that highly profitable activities attract capital, and that capital flees those with low profits. This is the market mechanism behind mean reversion, which is supposed to close the profitability gap. In reality, certain companies earn persistently high returns on equity. Superior returns are delivered to investors in the form of dividends, stock buybacks, and accretive growth.

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Written by Jonathan Davis

August 18, 2012 at 12:17 PM

An invidious choice

I find it hard to disagree with these comments from Sebastian Lyon, the CEO of Troy Asset Management, writing in the annual report of Personal Assets, the investment trust to which he and his colleagues now act as Investment Adviser, following the death of Ian Rushbrook four years ago.

The secular bear market in UK and US equities is now in its thirteenth year. How much longer must we wait until we can again be fully invested (or even geared!) and reap the double-digit returns we long for? Ask the policy makers! Stocks would be considerably lower were central banks not keeping stock prices artificially high by means of zero interest rates and quantitative easing. Despite these interferences, stock markets have gone sideways during the past year. Savers have not been rewarded for taking risk and hence our cautious strategy has paid off, for now, although we are likely to lag short term rises in the market should further monetary interventions be forthcoming.

Politicians in Europe are confronted with the invidious choice between severe austerity, which is likely to lead to periodic recessions and declining tax revenues, or incautious borrowing in the hope of buying growth. Both approaches will eventually force governments to pay higher rates of interest on debts. The maths do not stack up. No wonder governments are looking to extricate themselves from an intractable problem by leaning on central bankers to pull their inflationary strings. But our greatest concern is that the European challenges that have dogged markets since early 2010 are merely the dress rehearsal for the main event – a US fiscal crisis. While the UK and Europe have at least tried to tame their budget deficits, the United States has pushed ever harder on the fiscal accelerator. Stock markets swooned last August when they got a shock preview of what might happen should the brakes be applied. Following the public disagreement in Washington over increasing the public debt ceiling, the Dow Jones Industrials Index fell 13% in seven trading days. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Jonathan Davis

August 16, 2012 at 7:56 PM

The truth about future economic growth

Rob Arnott, the chairman of Research Affiliates, is one of the most articulate and interesting market analysts in the States, and someone whose ideas and research I have followed for a number of years. In my latest 30-minute podcast, I discuss with him the outlook for investment returns – and how they will be dramatically influenced by what he calls the three Ds now hanging over the world – debt, deficits and demographics. All three are conspiring to drag down likely future rates of economic growth in the developed world. Investors need not despair however, Rob argues: better returns are available if investors switch their focus from conventional benchmarks to a multi-asset strategy based on broad economic, rather than purely financial, criteria. Before listening in, click the link below to download a copy of the slides he used to develop his arguments at a recent presentation to a London Stock Exchange seminar. The podcast can be downloaded from here. Recommended.

Arnott LSE Presentation July 2012

Written by Jonathan Davis

July 29, 2012 at 5:30 PM

Patience the number one requirement

It is more than 15 years since I first trawled up to Edinburgh to meet Ian Rushbrook, the iconclastic onetime Ivory & Sime partner who took over the running of the near-dormant Personal Assets Trust in 1990 and soon turned it into one of the most successful capital preservation vehicles for private investors there is. Ian featured in my book Money Makers (first published in 1998, soon to be re-issued in a new edition).  A smart young fund manager called Sebastian Lyon was one of those who read my book and liking what he read, later made a pilgrimage to Ian’s den behind Charlotte Square to learn more about the business of managing money.

Now, several years on, as CEO of Troy Asset Management, a fund management business that originated as the guardian of  Weinstock family money, he also acts as Investment Adviser to Personal Assets, following Ian’s untimely death three years ago. The trust has since gone from strength to strength, delivering NAV growth of 51.7% in the three years to the end of November 2011, outperforming the FTSE All-Share by a useful margin as a result. With shareholders funds of more than £400 million, and a succesful no-discount policy in place, shares in the investment trust have now reached the giddy heights of being included in the FTSE 250 index. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Jonathan Davis

December 20, 2011 at 4:18 PM