An independent professional's take on the latest news and trends in global financial markets

Archive for the ‘Inflation’ Category

The “most dangerous investment environment ever”

These are the latest comments on the implications of the drastic policy measures being adopted by central banks in a so far unsuccessful attempt to stimulate their economies. They come from one of the most successful managers of a “real return” fund in the UK. Iain Stewart has been running the Newton Real Return fund since its launch in 2004, with only one small down year (2011). Anyone interested in capital preservation in the current uncertain climate is likely to find much that resonates here. The full story can be found here (source: FE Trustnet).

“Fixing the price of government bonds is a very risky policy as it can lead to mis-allocated capital. I would say now is the most dangerous environment I have ever seen. It feels nice when stock prices just keep going up, but if anything, those assets are being pushed up by policy. It may be an uncomfortable thought, but we need to keep reminding ourselves that the reason we are all bathing in an ocean of liquidity some five years on from the financial crisis is that we have, to date, failed to lay to rest the legacies of the last cycle. The problem is that forcing mature, ageing economies to grow through monetary easing is recreating the distortions and excesses which caused the crisis in the first place”. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Jonathan Davis

April 23, 2013 at 3:06 PM

Hold on to your hats in Japan

The dramatic upwards move in the Japanese equity market since the autumn has plenty further to go, according to Jonathan Ruffer, the founder of the private client fund management group Ruffer LLP, one of the professionals whose latest thinking I (and many others) like to follow closely.  Ruffer as a firm has held an overweight position in Japan for quite a long time, and now stands ready to be vindicated if Japan’s new reflation policy takes hold, as the markets now seem to be assuming. Writing in his latest quarterly review, he comments as follows:

We hold roughly half of portfolios in equities, in the UK, Europe, US and Asia, but the largest geographic position is in Japan. This market was broadly flat when we last wrote to you, although we had made good money in financial and property stocks. In the last quarter these and other holdings surged further, providing a strong finish to a dull year. The rationale in Japan remains intact; it is the warrant on world economic growth, and so more of the same in terms of monetary stimulus should favour Japan without the rest of the world’s downside. The stability of Japan, its lack of overcapacity, and the absence of financial or labour fragilities, give some protection, and afford it the ability to generate a self-sustaining economic recovery. The low expectations built into the possibility of a Japanese economic recovery provide the opportunity for further sharp market rises. The major obstacle to a more bullish backcloth has disappeared with the appointment of Abe as Prime Minister, and the forthcoming retirement of Shirikawa as Governor of the Bank of Japan. In this new world, the investment danger for foreigners is a weak yen (we have been fully hedged), but this is a benefit to the equity market. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Jonathan Davis

January 21, 2013 at 3:33 PM

A dissenting view on inflation

Has the Bank of England lost control of interest rates? You won’t hear that view from any official source, but it is worth listening to the economist Peter Warburton, the founder of the consultancy Economic Perspectives, whose often dissenting opinions have been more right than wrong over the past couple of decades. He argues differently in this contribution to the Shadow Monetary Policy Committee’s latest review of economic conditions, in which he warns about the incipient threat of price inflation. It is well worth reading: I suspect it will look very prescient when we look back in years to come.

It is becoming increasingly obvious that the Bank of England has lost control of UK retail borrowing costs. During the three years-plus that Bank Rate has been set at ½%, the average interest rate paid on banks’ and building societies’ notice deposit accounts has risen from a low of 0.17% in February 2009 to 1.83% in July 2012.

Admittedly, the quoted monthly rates have bounced around, but the average for 2012 is 1.41%. This is a measure of the average cost of retail funds to the banking sector; the marginal cost is closer to 3%. On the other side of the balance sheet, Santander UK has recently announced a 50 basis point increase in its standard variable mortgage rate, to 4.74% from October. Clearly, the level of Bank Rate has played no role in the evolution of market rates for the past three years. The MPC’s consideration of a cut in Bank Rate is perverse and farcical in this context. As and when the UK economic news flow permits, Bank Rate should be raised in order to reconnect it to the structure of market rates. However, with UK activity indicators currently erratic and weak, now is not a good time to do this. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Jonathan Davis

September 4, 2012 at 9:41 AM