An independent professional's take on the latest news and trends in global financial markets

Posts Tagged ‘corporate bonds

Reality and euphoria in the equity market

In the modern era strong equity market performance in January is not, as used to be believed in days gone by, a reliable forerunner of a good year ahead for the stock market, which is a pity as 2013 has certainly got off to a roaring start, with both the S&P 500 and the world index up by 5.0%, and the main Japanese indices up by nearly twice that amount.  After its lacklustre performance in 2012 the UK equity market produced an impressive 6.4% and China, a dark horse favourite for top performing stock market, a tad more.  However, as this useful corrective note from Soc Gen’s top-rated resident quant Andrew Lapthorne makes clear, there are some curious features of the markets’ generally impressive performance that give cause to doubt quite how enduring this rally will in practice prove to be.

Firstly debt issuance by companies is riding high and a large chunk of this debt is being used to buy back shares. This creates a virtuous circle, where increasing debt issuance supports share prices, pushing down implied leverage and volatility at the same time, which in turn supports ever cheaper credit for the corporate. So, once again, with one of the key marginal buyers of equities the corporate, using capital raised in the debt market means that, as ever, the fate of the corporate bond and equity market are intertwined and as such last week\’s weakness in the high yield bond market is worth keeping tabs on. Read the rest of this entry »

Fools rush in while wise men take their time?

The New Year has started well, with plenty of evidence that professional investors are continuing to rediscover their appetite for risk assets, with the price of equities, corporate bonds and high yield debt all heading higher. The charts for leading equity indices, including the S&P 500 and the FTSE All-Share, have been trending higher ever since Mario Draghi, the head of the European Central Bank, announced last summer his intention to “do whatever it takes” to prevent the eurozone from falling apart. He has every reason to be pleased with the response to his intervention, which to date has been effectively cost-free. Would it were always so easy! European stock markets, having been priced for disaster before, have led the way up as fears of the euro’s fragmentation recede. Volatility, as measured by the VIX, has meanwhile fallen to multi-year low levels. Read the rest of this entry »