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Posts Tagged ‘monetary policy

It’s all about her background, stupid

There is a long and interesting profile of Janet Yellen, the head of the Federal Reserve, in the latest issue of the New Yorker. As you might expect from this longstanding voice of the liberal New York elite, it paints her in a  sympathetic light, and usefully draws attention to how and where her views about the role of economics and the central bank were formed.  Here is a short extract, in which the author picks up on the fact that her first official public appearance after succeeding Ben Bernanke in the job was carefully chosen to send a message about her priorities:

She had gone to Chicago a few weeks earlier to speak at a conference for neighbourhood revitalisation organisations – not the venue a new Fed chair wouuld ordinarily choose for a maiden speech. Yellen was sending a signal. As she put it that day “Although we work through financial markets, our goal is to help Main Street, not Wall Street”. More than five years after the financial crisis, historically high numbers of Americans are still out of the labor force, working part time when they’d rather be full time, or unemployed for more than six months. Yellen spoke mainly about unemployment, and told the stories of three blue-collar Chiacagoans, two black, one white, who had lost their jobs in the recession. Her staff had found these people for her, and she had spoken to them on the phone before her speech. Two of the three – from Chicago’s desperately poor West Side – had criminal records.

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Written by Jonathan Davis

July 28, 2014 at 4:21 PM

Change on the way at the Bank of England?

I have always liked the pragmatic approach to economics of the Financial Times Economics Editor Chris Giles, whose balanced pieces are a useful corrective to the doctrinally-driven work of most economists. His recent article in the Financial Times included this sensible comment on the most recent speech by Sir Mervyn King, Governor of the Bank of England, which I think was a significant milestone on the road towards what increasingly looks like a coming change in emphasis in UK monetary policy.

On Tuesday evening, Sir Mervyn King completed his slow conversion from being an activist on what economists call the “demand side” to a “supply side” pessimist. Where the Bank of England governor once saw monetary policy as a simple tool to reinvigorate spending and bring the level of output back to its previous trend, his speech indicates he now sees the pre-crisis period as infected by unsustainably overexposed bank lending and “unsustainable paths of consumption”. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Jonathan Davis

January 27, 2013 at 8:29 PM